Andrea Lundgren

It sounds audacious, but it is largely the premise of Dorothy L. Sayers’ The Mind of the Maker. Because writers, like other artists, are “sub-creators,” they can give us a unique perspective on the Creator Himself, which can simplify questions of how one can make good and evil, and how miracle, free will, and the Trinity might work in less “theological” terms.

She addresses the seeming-impertinence of such an approach:

“Skeptics frequently complain that man has made God in his own image; they should in reason go further (as many of them do) and acknowledge that man has made all existence in his own image. If the tendency to anthropomorphism is a good reason for refusing to think about God, it is an equally good reason for refusing to think about light, or oysters, or battleships.

“It may quite well be perilous, as it must be inadequate, to interpret the…

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